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New Forged Alum Wheels and Suspension Changes
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  1. #1
    Member
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    Nov 2008
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    Seattle, WA
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    31

    Default New Forged Alum Wheels and Suspension Changes

    I'm looking for suspension advice.

    I've a 2006 CBR1000RR, track only with stock cast Aluminum wheels. I'm upgrading to forged Aluminum, which will lighten each end roughly 3 lbs.

    Generally, what changes should I make to the suspension? It's Ohlins shock in the rear and 25mm Ohlins FGK 1260 Cartridges in front.

    I'm thinking preloads stay the same, probable changes are needed for compression and rebound, but uncertain what would be a good starting point.

    I'm mid-pack in the fast groups, 12 track days per year.
    Last edited by firedave; 03-09-2017 at 07:31 AM.

  2. #2

    Default

    My limited experience is having to dial in more rebound, however I have seen major adjustments needed in the past. Hit up Barry at KFG or Dave at Fluid suspension for more/better information.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Mount Vernon
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    Default

    If you want to come at it from a theoretical point of view with back of the napkin calcs:

    To keep the same basic suspension characteristics:
    - Spring rate would need to be softened by the same percentage that mass is lowered ( w_n^2*m = k , keep w_n constant )
    - Damping would need to be reduced by the square root of the product of mass reduction and spring reduction ( 2*Z_d*sqrt(m*k) = c , keep Z_d constant)

    For those changes you would need to know your suspensions damping curves and how adjustments affect them. Your forks and shock will have digressive curves with separate adjustment for each section, and they may require different changes as well. Might need more high-speed given there's less mass to accelerate over bumps, but you also have less mass to decelerate with the damping (assuming you even have high-speed adjustment!). I would start by reducing damping and spring all around, then fine tune with test and tune methods, or have someone who's done the work before to do it for you.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Gienau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Oak Harbor,WA
    Posts
    362

    Default

    What is this suspension thing you talk of?
    WMRRA #230


    "Live Life, Taste Death."

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